Archive | October 2016

Three Cumbria Rounds, 3 videos

trailpiketrilogyA linked series of 3 short films recognising the 3 running legends who have given their names to iconic running challenges in the Lake District:
• The Bob Graham Round
• The Joss Naylor Lakeland Challenge
• The Gerry Charnley Round
The films aim to mark the contribution of these legends of the fell running scene, whilst giving viewers an immersive experience of what it’s like to be part these challenges.

So says the publicity blurb for The Trailpike Trilogy, which I have just been made aware of. They are being made by fell runner and poet Geoff Cox, who has teamed up with film-makers No Routes Found Collective to create three distinctly different short films. The first of them is called ‘A Shepherds Hand’ and features the Joss Naylor Lakeland Challenge. It has it’s premiere at the Kendal Mountain Festival on November 18th and is in final editing at the moment.

Geoff is starting work on the second film now, which will be the Bob Graham Round one. I have been in discussion with Geoff about sourcing some historical photographs for the film, particularly from the early days. He says that there are numerous great photographs of ‘fell racing in the Lake District, but far fewer of fell running. Runners without numbers is how I like to think of this.’ Having done a bunch of photo research for my book on the Bob Graham round,  I was able to give Geoff a few leads to follow.

trailpikepdfIf you want to know more about the project then download the 3 page PDF publicity sheet which has contact details. There is also information on how you can support the venture, especially sponsoring (filming costs, etc).

If you want more information on the challenges then I can only point you to ‘It’s a hill, get over it’ (my book on fell running’s history and characters), and for a full and detailed history of the Bob Graham Round and its innovators to ‘The Round: in Bob Graham’s footsteps’.

[The Round is out in paperback early in 2017, and can be pre-ordered now]

In profile: Jack Maitland

Jack feels that the highlight of his fell career was probably winning the British Championship. In mountain racing it would be winning Mount Cameroon and the Everest marathon (both in 1989). ‘You remember the wins, don’t you. I won Burnsall but never won the Ben, Snowdon or the Three Peaks. I had a lot of seconds! I came against some very classy athletes in that era. I think I got the most I could out of myself, for instance in that Snowdon race.’

Jack Maitland reflected on his career in the third article to appear in the latest Fellrunner under my byline. It resulted from an interview I conducted with him as part of my research for my new book, Running Hard: the story of a rivalry. After the long and fascinating interview I realised there was more info on Jack than I needed for backgrounding him for the book, so I decided to write a profile of him as well (with his approval, and with some of his photos).

inprofilejack

jack-with-views-of-everest-behind_smallerThe full article may be viewed here: [PDF of article]. Postscript: it was pointed out to me after the magazine was published that the photo on the second page [see photo left] which was captioned ‘1989 Jack with views of Everest behind‘ is mis-captioned, as it actually shows Ama Dablam! Although I should have realised, I missed it, and can only say that I carried forward the caption that I was given for it.

The next issue of The Fellrunner will include a follow-up article: In Profile: Hugh Symonds.